U.S. Foreign Relations Law Posts

U.S. Supreme Court Cites Foreign Relations 3d

The U.S. Supreme Court held in Jam v. International Finance Corp., No. 17-1011 (Feb. 27, 2019) that, under the International Organizations Immunities Act of 1945 (IOIA), international organizations are entitled to the “same immunity” from suit that foreign governments enjoy today—which generally does not extend to commercial activities—rather than to the virtually absolute immunity that foreign governments enjoyed when the IOIA was originally enacted.

Limits on Jurisdiction

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At UVA Law’s 31st Sokol Colloquium, Duke law professor Ralf Michaels, Indiana University law professor Austen Parrish, Fordham law professor Thomas Lee and UC Hastings law professor Chimène Keitner discussed limits on jurisdiction in international law with moderator and UVA law professor Anne Woolhandler.

Sovereign Immunity

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Watch video from UVA Law’s 31st Sokol Colloquium, where Rutgers law professor Beth Stephens, Georgetown law professor David Stewart and University of Michigan law professor Kristina Daugirdas discussed sovereign immunity with moderator and United Kingdom Court of Appeals Lord Justice (ret.) Sir Jack Beatson. During the colloquium, scholars, jurists and practitioners discussed ALI’s Restatement of the Foreign Relations Law of the United States.

From International Law and International Relations to Law and World Politics

Political scientists — primarily in the discipline’s international relations subfield — have long studied international law. This article identifies five stages of political science research on international law, including the current interdisciplinary international law and international relations (IL/IR) stage, and it reviews three trends in political science research that constitute an emerging sixth stage of interdisciplinary scholarship: a law and world politics (L/WP) stage.