Tribal Powers over Nonmembers – Part 1

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In the American Indian Law project draft that will be presented at the 2018 Annual Meeting, two Sections deal with tribal powers over nonmembers – § 34, Civil Regulatory and Adjudicatory Authority over Nonmembers and § 35, Tribal-Court Exhaustion Rule. This is the first of two posts that present the Black Letter and Comments from the draft.

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South Dakota Beats Alabama in Passage of Data Breach Notification Law

South Dakota passed the finish line right before Alabama, but both states have now joined the rest of the nation in enacting data breach notification laws for their citizens. Last month, South Dakota Governor Dennis Daugaard signed South Dakota § 22-40-19 et. seq., the South Dakota Data Breach Notification Law, into effect. Alabama Governor Kay Ivey’s signature on April 3, 2018, inked the final state data breach law into effect.

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Leaving Clients at the Door

The diversity of experience and opinion in our membership, as well as the character and motivation of individual members, are an important part of what makes our work influential. With such diversity, disagreement is inevitable, but the vision of the founders of the ALI was that members would view their participation as a public service, and not as in the service of the self or of clients. And this should inform members on how we are to engage in the work of the ALI.

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Senate bills would expand tribal jurisdiction

Language in a bill currently going through the Senate states, “Congress finds that American Indian children and Alaska Native children experience PTSD at a rate of 22 percent, which is the same rate at which Afghanistan and Iraq war veterans experience PTSD.” Several bills have been introduced during this Congress to help combat that staggering rate and, at the same time, increase tribal jurisdiction in several other areas.

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Is lack of dental care child neglect?

A Stroudsburg, Pa., mom was threatened to be reported for child abuse after a dentist claims she failed to take her child for regular dental treatment.

On March 19, Trey Hoyumpa posted a letter she received from Smiles 4 Keeps, a pediatric dental office in Bartonsville, Pa.

In the letter, the office informs her that if she does not bring her child for a “regular professional cleaning and treatment,” they can charge her with “dental neglect.”

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