Nonconsensual condom removal during sexual intercourse exposes victims to physical risks of pregnancy and disease and, interviews make clear, is experienced by many as a grave violation of dignity and autonomy. Such condom removal, popularly known as “stealthing,” can be understood to transform consensual sex into nonconsensual sex by one of two theories, one of which poses a risk of over-criminalization by demanding complete transparency about reproductive capacity and sexually transmitted infections. Adopting the alternative, preferable theory of non-consent, this Article considers possible criminal, tort, contract, and civil rights remedies currently available to victims. Ultimately, a new tort for “stealthing” is necessary both to provide victims with a more viable cause of action and to reflect better the harms wrought by nonconsensual condom removal.

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Alexandra Brodsky

National Women's Law Center

Alexandra Brodsky is a Skadden Fellow at National Women's Law Center, as well as a co-founder of Know Your IX, for which she served as co-director for over two years. Alexandra is an editor at Feministing.com. Her writing has appeared in publications including the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, POLITICO Magazine, The Nation, the Atlantic, and Dissent. She tweets as @azbrodsky.

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