U.S. Foreign Relations Law Posts

Limits on Jurisdiction

Watch Ralf Michaels of Duke Law, Austen Parrish of Indiana Law, Thomas Lee of Fordham Law, and Chimène Keitner of UC Hastings discuss limits on jurisdiction in international law with moderator and Anne Woolhandler of UVA Law at UVA Law’s 31st Sokol Colloquium.

From International Law and International Relations to Law and World Politics

Political scientists — primarily in the discipline’s international relations subfield — have long studied international law. This article identifies five stages of political science research on international law, including the current interdisciplinary international law and international relations (IL/IR) stage, and it reviews three trends in political science research that constitute an emerging sixth stage of interdisciplinary scholarship: a law and world politics (L/WP) stage.

Courts Cite Foreign Relations 4th

Two courts recently cited the Restatement of the Law Fourth, The Foreign Relations Law of the United States, the official text of which is now available.

Does Congress Care That the President Controls International Law?

We have a new draft paper, forthcoming in the Harvard Law Review, on how extensively the president has come to control international law for the United States, and what, if anything, should be done about it. As we explain at the end of this post, one of the central questions implicated by the paper is: Does Congress care?